Course & Seminar Descriptions

All ESD-U courses will occur virtually with real-time instruction, utilizing the Zoom and Canvas platforms. Opportunities for in-person participation in select sessions will be provided throughout the year and will be held at the ESD 112 Vancouver campus (2500 NE 65th Ave. Vancouver, WA, 98661).

Click on a course title below to read the course description:

Required Introductory Course

Essential Foundations of ESD-U Course

This course is required for all ESD-U candidates, including Route 2, Route 3, Route 4, and Retooling.

This three-day summer course serves as an orientation to the ESD-U program, as well as an introduction to the vocabulary and educational foundations critical for engagement in the ESD-U endorsement pathways and seminars. Topics include the logistical and philosophical knowledge needed to manage ESD-U systems, an overview of the curriculum and learning as an adult, instruction in academic success and writing, exposure to learning theories, exploration of teaching standards and practices, and a look ahead to professional learning communities and future development. On Day 3 candidates will have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with their instructors, program staff and peers, and will be able to pick up textbooks and other course materials at the ESD 112 Conference Center.

Elementary Education Courses

Full description of competencies located on PESB website (opens in a new window).

ELEM ED 101 – Teaching as a Profession: Foundations for Elementary Education Instruction, Elementary Education Systems & Political Issues

Candidates will gain a broad overview of present issues in elementary education, including fundamentals of instructional design, the teaching and learning cycle, state and federal education policy, issues of equity and access, and state learning standards. Emphasis will be placed on core knowledge and skills relevant across content areas and grade levels. Candidates will gain understanding of the teaching and learning cycle that will form the foundation for subsequent content-area methods courses.

Competencies
Assessed: 2.B-D, 4.A-B
Addressed: 2.B-D, 4.A-5.G

ELEM ED 202 – Child Growth & Development, Safe & Positive Learning Environments

This course will provide practical, research-based background about child development in order to establish meaningful context for application of the teaching and learning cycle. Candidates will understand major concepts, theories, and research related to typical and atypical development including cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, creative and physical development. Drawing upon this understanding of child development, candidates will understand strategies and structures for establishing and maintaining positive and productive classroom learning environments. Candidates will also understand how a child’s learning is influenced by family, home, and community factors, including socioeconomic status (SES), family value of education, cultural background, ethnicity, gender, language development, and exceptional abilities.

Competencies
Assessed: 2.A-B, 3.A-5.G
Addressed: 2.A, 3.A-H

ELEM ED 303 – PE/Health Methods & Art/Music Methods

This course will provide an introduction to the application of the teaching and learning cycle to physical education, health, art and music in the elementary classroom. Candidates will understand how learning in and through these disciplines supports 21st Century Skills such as creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and habits of mind such as persistence, observation, reflection, and how these skills support success in and out of school. Candidates will also understand how learning in and through these disciplines supports academic and social/emotional learning for all students. The course will also provide an overview of Washington state standards as they relate to physical education, health, art and music.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A, 1.C, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.A.10, 1.C

ELEM ED 405 – Math/STEM Methods #1

This course is an introduction to the methods and materials used in the teaching of mathematics in grades K-8. Emphasis will be on instructional planning, concept development and the use of the Washington State Learning Standards to anchor instructional decisions. In this course, candidates will develop skills and identify resources to plan and teach effective, standards-based math lessons as they move through the teaching and learning cycle. Candidates will learn how to establish equitable learning environments that are accessible while maintaining high expectations for all students.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.D, 4.A-C
Assessed: 1.D.1-6, 1.D.11-12, 4.A-C

ELEM ED 406 – Math/STEM Methods #2

This course is an introduction to approaches for gathering and evaluating assessment information to guide instructional decisions in the mathematics classroom as critical steps in the teaching and learning cycle. Candidates will make connections with the Washington State Learning Standards and explore how students make sense of mathematics as they examine student work and conduct interview assessments. Candidates will explore how to use this information as the basis for planning equitable and accessible classroom instruction.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.D.7-10, 1.D.12,4.C-5.G
Assessed: 1.D.7-10, 1.D.12, 4.D-5.G

ELEM ED 505 – Multimodal Literacy Practices

This course will focus on multimodal literacies and assessment. Candidates will investigate how learning in and through the arts simultaneously supports academic learning, social/emotional growth, 21st century skills and the Habits of Mind that promote a learner’s agency and achievement. Candidates will analyze and apply a wide range of research-based assessment strategies and tools.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.A

ELEM ED 606 – Science/STEM Methods

Candidates will be introduced to Washington State Learning Standards for science and examine the developmental and social foundations of science learning. Candidates will explore how to implement a hands-on approach anchored by scientific phenomena relevant to the foundational concepts. The significance of cross-cutting concepts as connective themes in student learning will be explored. This course will describe best practices for creating a physically, emotionally and academically safe learning environment for all students that acknowledges and appreciates students’ unique experiences and makes content accessible to learners who come from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.E.1, 1.E.3-8, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.E.1, 1.E.4-8

ELEM ED 607 – STEM Methods

This course will provide an introduction to curricular and instructional practices that can be used to integrate science into the elementary classroom through the lens of a multidisciplinary STEM-based approach. Candidates will utilize the Washington State Learning Standards and examine the role of mathematical modeling while practicing how to plan for and assess these standards using inquiry-based and student-centered pedagogical approaches. Candidates will learn how to create relevant instructional materials by making connections to real-world STEM-related problems in their community. Candidates will focus on integrating best practices that acknowledge and appreciate students’ unique experiences and make content accessible to learners who come from diverse racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.D.11, 1.E.2-5, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.D.11, 1.E.2-3

ELEM ED 707 – Social Studies Methods

Candidates will be introduced to the Washington State Learning Standards and the progression of learning that students follow during their school experience. Candidates will explore the role of critical literacy in operationalizing thoughtful, participatory civic engagement. Considerations of multiple perspectives and divergent narratives in the teaching and learning of history will be a focal point of this course. Connections to geography and economics as influential factors that shape culture and history will be drawn. Candidates will examine how to plan and teach using an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based approach in order to create equitable and meaningful learning experiences for all students.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.B.4-5, 1.E.9-1.F.5, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.B.4-5, 1.F.1-5

ELEM ED 909/910 – ELA Reading and Writing Methods

This course will focus on the knowledge and understanding of the processes, purposes and practical aspects of teaching reading and writing. Candidates will understand semantics, syntax, morphology and phonology as it relates to Standard American English. Upon completion of this course, candidates will understand and construct meaning from a wide variety of culturally relevant literary and expository text. This learning will include a range of strategies used to comprehend, analyze, interpret and evaluate text. This course will support candidates in understanding the variability in reading levels among children and how to utilize varied assessment tools to inform instruction. Candidates will learn the recursive, interactive and collaborative nature of the writing process and how the diverse life experiences of the writer shape the writing. This course will address finding a clear purpose, audience, and perspective for writing and how students can utilize various formats and technologies. Candidates will have opportunities to learn culturally responsive teaching practices, participate in reflective activities to examine their own experiences.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.B.1-3, 4.A-5.G
Assessed: 1.B.1-3, 5.A-5.E

NES Elementary Education Test Preparation Session

This session will provide current candidates and prospective applicants with information regarding the NES Elementary Education endorsement test. The focus will be on the structure of the test, what content is covered on the test, and how to prepare for the test. Candidates will learn study methods and test-taking strategies, as well as what resources and preparation tools are available.

English Language Learner (ELL) Courses

Full description of competencies located on PESB website (opens in a new window).

ELL 101 – Teaching English Learners

An introductory course to the joys and challenges of teaching students learning English. Course to include what one needs to know the first day, week, and month of teaching – how to create productive learning environments, pedagogical and content knowledge, and knowledge of learners and learning. Course includes efficient organizational systems to complete timelines, schedule students and staff, as well as effective communication in supervision of paras and collaborating with other team members. Course explores theories and principles of language instruction for English learners (ELs).

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A-F, 3.A-C, 3.F
Assessed: 1.A-B, 3.A-C

ELL 202 – Teaching Content

Reading, writing, and math to include support for Multilingual Learners of all English language proficiencies. literacy will include support for all domains of language. Math will include number sense to algebra strategies. Course will include content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge with an emphasis on how to create a culture of learning through culturally responsive practices. This includes how to assess current knowledge, design engaging lessons, engage families, and continually assess and differentiate to maximize learning.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.C, 4.A-4.J
Assessed: 1.C, 4.A, 4.C-D

ELL 303 – Lesson Planning for English Language Learners

Course includes writing lessons from start to finish including reflection on lessons. Course explores standards-based content and language objectives, aligning English Language Proficiency Standards to lesson objectives and assessments, planning instructional activities to meet all levels of language acquisition with effective EL strategies, and innovative and authentic assessment practices.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.F, 3.G-4.O
Assessed: 1.F, 3.G, 4.G-H, 4.K

ELL 404 – Assessments and Data Use in ESOL Instruction

Course includes instruction in summative and formative assessments, particularly how to systematically use the assessment data to drive instruction. This includes understanding scores and how to explain scores to others. Course examines appropriateness of assessment measures, and culturally appropriate testing situations of English Learners, formal and informal assessment, exiting, and monitoring of student progress for students in grades K-12. Emphasis on culturally responsive practices in assessment in order to meet the needs of and effectively assess culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.B-C, 2.E, 4.J-O
Assessed: 4.J, 4.L-O

ELL 606 – Lesson Planning for Productive Student Behaviors, Classroom Management and Student Engagement

Course to include how to plan and write engaging lessons and how to manage unproductive behaviors should they arise while teaching. Course includes practical and effective motivational strategies for adults and students. Motivational and classroom management strategies to include all student levels. Focus is on creating restorative and relational learning environments that maximize student engagement and thus reduce unproductive behaviors. To include strategies for management of self, students, and staff with focus on how to remediate unproductive behaviors when they occur.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.A-H, 3.H-I, 4.D-I, 4.K
Assessed: 2.B, 4.G-H

ELL 707 – Lesson Planning for Inclusion and Differentiation

Course includes elements of an effective lesson plan with target objectives, language objectives, structure, discourse, and activities that allow for differentiated instruction and access to the content for all multilingual learners. Also to include assessment to adjust instruction, measure growth or to address concerns.

Competencies
Addressed: 3.D-E, 4.A, 4.C-L
Assessed: 3.D-E, 4.E-F, 4.I

ELL 808 – Methods for Integration of Language Instruction

Course to include how to integrate language proficiency standards to lessons. Includes effective EL strategies, meaningful activities, methods, materials and assessments to measure progress in each of the four language domains.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.C-E, 3.F, 4.A-K
Assessed: 1.D-E, 3.F, 4.B

ELL 909/910 – Teaching Elementary and Secondary English Learners

Course explores the relationships between culture, diversity, and language learning processes as well as their ramifications on learning for students in grades K-12. Emphasis on culturally responsive practices in language development and content area teaching and learning in order to meet the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. This is the integrative course for the ELL endorsement area.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.A-H, 4.D-E
Assessed: 2.A, 2.C-F

WEST-E English Language Learner Test Preparation Session

This session will provide current candidates and prospective applicants with information regarding the WEST-E English Language Learner test. The focus will be on the structure of the test, what content is covered on the test, and how to prepare for the test. Candidates will learn study methods and testtaking strategies, as well as what resources and preparation tools are available.

Reading Courses

Full description of competencies located on PESB website (opens in a new window).

RDG 101 – Teaching Readers

An introductory course to teaching the essential components of reading to learners. Course includes culture and oral language development and reading acquisition for various stages of development.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A-F, 3.A-F, 4.C-D
Assessed: 1.A, 3.F, 4.C-D

RDG 105/110 – Teaching Elementary and Secondary Reading

Each candidate to choose one focus class based on his/her grade level. Course will include literacy one and literacy two components as well as teaching comprehension.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A-F, 3.A, 4.E-6.D
Assessed: 1.C, 3.A, 4.E, 5.B, 6.A

RDG 202 – Reading Instruction Methods

Reading will include the five domains. Course includes content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge with an emphasis on how to create a culture of learning. This culture includes how to assess current knowledge, design engaging lessons, and continually assess and differentiate to maximize learning.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A-F, 3.D-E, 4.E-I
Assessed: 1.B, 3.D-E, 4.F

RDG 303 – Lesson Planning for Readers

Course includes writing lessons from start to finish to include reflection on lessons.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.A-C, 3.C, 4.E-I, 6.B-D
Assessed: 3.C, 4.G, 6.C-D

RDG 404 – Assessments and Data Use in Reading Instruction

Course includes instruction in Summative (standardized) and Formative tests (criterion, CBMs), particularly how to systematically use data to drive instruction. To include understanding scores and how to explain scores to others.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.A-C, 6.B-D
Assessed: 2.A-C, 6.B

RDG 707 – Lesson Planning for Inclusion and Differentiation

Course includes elements of an effective lesson plan with target objectives, an activity, and an assessment that creates a differentiated tier of involvement for all language proficiency levels from entering to bridging. Also to include intervention and accommodations particular to dually-served students.

Competencies
Addressed: 4.A-5.C
Assessed: 4.A-B, 4.H-I, 5.C

RDG 808 – Methods of Reading Instruction

Course to include how to integrate reading standards to lesson materials. Includes effective methods for selecting materials, creating meaningful activities, and designing assessments to measure progress in each of the reading domains. Course examines curriculum materials to ensure focus on comprehension and meaning especially for developmental, cultural, and linguistically diverse learners.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.A-F, 3.B, 5.A-C
Assessed: 1.D-F, 3.B, 5.A

NES Essential Components of Elementary Reading Instruction Test Preparation Session

This session will provide current candidates and prospective applicants with information regarding the NES Essential Components of Elementary Reading Instruction endorsement test. The focus will be on the structure of the test, what content is covered on the test, and how to prepare for the test. Candidates will learn study methods and test-taking strategies, as well as what resources and preparation tools are available.

Special Education (SPED) Courses

Full description of competencies located on PESB website (opens in a new window).

SPED 101 –Teaching Multicultural Students with Disabilities in K-12

An introductory course to the joys and challenges of teaching students with disabilities to include practical strategies as well as theory. Course to include what one needs to know the first day, week, and month of teaching – how to create productive learning environments, pedagogical and content knowledge, and knowledge of learners and learning. Course includes efficient organizational systems to complete timelines, schedule students and staff, as well as effective communication in supervision of paras and collaborating with other team members.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.1-8, 4.10-11, 6.1-6
Assessed: 1.6-8, 4.10-11, 6.1

SPED 202 – Teaching Content

Reading, writing, and math to include all levels from high needs to consult. Reading will include the five domains. Writing will include fine motor strategies. Math will include number sense to algebra strategies. Course will include content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge with an emphasis on how to create a culture of learning. This culture includes how to assess current knowledge, design engaging lessons, and continually assess and differentiate to maximize learning.

Competencies
Addressed: 4.4-7, 6.2, 6.4-5
Assessed: 4.4-7, 6.4

SPED 303 – Writing Compliant IEPs

Within this course, candidates will develop and demonstrate skills in completing all aspects of a legally compliant, equitable, strengths-based, student-focused IEP. Candidates will demonstrate an understanding of disproportionality, the influence of being culturally responsive in special education practices, roles/responsibilities within IEP meetings, collaboration with team members, and how to facilitate meetings that emphasize family and student participation.

Competencies
Addressed: 3.1-6, 4.1-14, 6.3-4
Assessed: 4.1-2, 4.8, 4.12-14

SPED 404 – Assessments & Data Use in Special Education

Candidates will determine appropriate data collection methods, assessments (classroom-based, districtwide, and statewide) based upon student need, and understand how to systematically use data to drive instruction and IEP goals.

Competencies
Addressed: 3.1-6, 6.3
Assessed: 3.1-4, 3.6, 6.3

SPED 606 – Lesson Planning for Productive Student Behaviors, Classroom Management and Student Engagement

This course will address how to plan and write engaging lessons and how to manage unproductive behaviors should they arise while teaching. This course includes practical and effective motivational strategies for adults and students. Motivational and classroom management strategies to include all student levels. The focus is on creating restorative and relational learning environments that maximize student engagement and thus reduce unproductive behaviors including strategies for management of self, students, and staff with focus on how to remediate unproductive behaviors when they occur.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.1-6, 4.3-8, 5.1-5, 6.4-5
Assessed: 5.1-2, 5.4-5, 6.5

SPED 707 – Lesson Planning for Inclusion and Differentiation

Course includes elements of an effective lesson plan with target objectives, an activity, and an assessment that creates a differentiated tier of involvement for all student levels from high needs to consult. Also to include learning theories as well as modifications and accommodations particular to the group with which one is teaching and learning. This course builds on initial content and pedagogical content learning in SPED 202 and on motivational concepts in SPED 606.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.1-6, 3.5, 4.3-8, 5.1-5, 6.4-5
Assessed: 2.2-3,2.6, 3.5, 4.3, 5.3

SPED 808 – Legal Issues in Special Education

Legal Issues in Special Education: Course to include not only IDEA, ADA, and WAC, but also up-to-date case law guiding special education. To include legal “hot spots” and how to comply with all laws and procedures efficiently.

Competencies
Addressed: 1.1-8, 3.1-6, 6.1, 6.3. 6.6
Assessed: 1.1-7

SPED 909/910 – Teaching Elementary and Secondary Students with Disabilities

Course will include an introduction to developmental theories as well as application of theory for structuring lessons, student assessment, identification and instructional practices. This course addresses collaboration with staff specifically applicable to elementary or secondary environments. Course includes acquisition of knowledge for how people learn, specific disabilities, and roles and responsibilities of educators.

Competencies
Addressed: 2.1-6, 4.1, 4.9, 6.1-6
Assessed: 2.1, 2.4-5, 4.9, 6.2, 6.6

WEST-E Special Education Test Preparation Session

This session will provide current candidates and prospective applicants with information regarding the WEST-E Special Education endorsement test. The focus will be on the structure of the test, what content is covered on the test, and how to prepare for the test. Candidates will learn study methods and testtaking strategies, as well as what resources and preparation tools are available.

Seminars

Behavior Management

This seminar will focus on the current learning and challenges in behavior management, including the impact of trauma on student behavior. Focus will be on the basic functions and strategies of behavior management as well as the escalation and de-escalation crisis cycle. Candidates will learn the functions of behavior, as well as strategies and techniques for working with students exhibiting challenging behaviors.

Building Capacity in Tier 1: Co-Teaching While Supporting English Language Development

This seminar models effective professional collaboration and strategies for making content comprehensible while supporting students developing English language skills.

Classroom Management

This seminar explores why good classroom management can be challenging and will focus on basic behavior principles and positive behavior interventions. Candidates will learn classroom management strategies and techniques, including the CHAMPS model of positive behavior supports from Safe and Civil Schools as well as the STOIC framework and how it applies to classroom and behavior management. Candidates will develop their own classroom management plan.

Creating an Inclusive Classroom

Candidates will develop an understanding of diffusion of innovation and systems change. Candidates will consider the stages of implementation science and where their school/district teams are in implementing inclusive practices. Identifying system drivers will help candidates understand how they, as educational leaders, can champion change in meaningful ways.

Culturally Responsive Teaching Part 1 & Part 2

This seminar is divided into two parts – Part 1 takes place in the summer before candidates start their field experience and begin working with students, and Part 2 takes place in the middle of the school year while candidates are working with students as part of their field experience.

This seminar will help teacher candidates be more reflective of the ways that their identities shape their perspectives as they interact with and perceive their students and school systems. Candidates will reflect on the ways that schooling can be an unwelcoming space for students who have been marginalized due to their race, gender, class, ability, sexual orientation, gender identity, etc. The seminar will encourage candidates to reflect on their privileges and biases and to challenge the assumptions that they may have about marginalized students. Finally, candidates will create an action plan where they are critically analyzing the ways that their classroom behaviors, instruction, and curriculum can be transformed to create a more inclusive space for students who hold different identities.

ELL Deep Dive: Using Content Data to Support EL Students

This seminar is required for ELL candidates.

This seminar includes instruction in Summative (standardized) and Formative tests (criterion, CBMs), particularly how to systematically use data to drive instruction for English learners. Candidates will learn how to understand and interpret scores and how to explain the scores to others.

Intro to Working with EL Students

This seminar is required for candidates in endorsement areas other than ELL.

This seminar will provide an overview of the fundamental knowledge and skills required for all teachers to recognize and support students who are learning English. A key focus will be understanding the challenges faced by students who are learning English and identifying instructional strategies to support English language development and content mastery. The seminar will describe many ways ELL professionals provide support and developmental encouragement for language learners, as well as strategies for teachers in other specializations to work with ELL colleagues to support and encourage students.

Intro to Working with Students with Disabilities

This seminar is required for candidates in endorsement areas other than SPED.

This seminar will focus on the fundamental knowledge and skills required for all teachers to recognize and support students with disabilities and other learning challenges. Focus will be on understanding the impact disabilities have on student learning and the ways special education professionals provide support and developmental encouragement. The seminar will explore specially designed instruction in general education settings, as well as supports, instructional approaches, collaboration with other professionals, and processes related to classification and documentation for supportive education.

Issues of Abuse (Asynchronous)

This required, asynchronous course is a self-paced exploration of critical issues for aspiring educators to help ensure the safety and welfare of students. Topics include understanding child abuse and neglect, mandatory reporting standards, confidentiality guidelines, suicide awareness and prevention, bullying, and bullying prevention. Candidates must complete this course prior to completing field education requirements, no later than September 1.

Leading Paraeducators

This seminar explores how paraeducators can be amazing assets and partners in the classroom for new teachers. Focus will be on understanding the role and responsibilities of paraeducators and how they are different from the role and responsibilities of a teacher. Candidates will learn about the paraeducator standards of practice, as well as methods and strategies for supervising and leading paraeducators.

Since Time Immemorial

This seminar will explore the history and experiences of indigenous people groups, as well as the realities that continue to shape the lives of indigenous people. Candidates will also be exposed to the Since Time Immemorial curriculum and instructional materials to enable them to promote learning and understanding of systemic issues impacting indigenous people in their own classrooms.

Social Emotional Learning for the Inclusive Classroom

Candidates will understand the promise of effective social emotional learning (SEL) practices. Candidates will learn about the importance of teacher agency, as it relates to SEL instruction. Understanding the roadblocks in SEL will help candidates understand how they can proactively plan to overcome barriers and support other educators with change at the building level. This seminar will provide candidates with an understanding of these concepts, and opportunities to collaborate with each other.

SPED Deep Dive: IEPs

This seminar is required for SPED candidates. This seminar is focused on understanding and writing successful IEPs.

Transition to Teaching Part 1 & 2

This seminar is divided into two parts – Part 1 takes place in the summer before candidates start the transition to teaching through their field experience and Part 2 takes place at the end of the school year when candidates have started the transition process.

This seminar explores what the transition to teaching will be like for candidates who are transitioning from the roles of paraeducators, career changers, substitutes, and teachers of record. Candidates will learn about the paraeducator standards and the InTASC teacher standards and will compare the responsibilities for these roles. Candidates will complete a self-assessment using the InTASC teacher standards and will reflect on areas of strength and areas of improvement, which will be incorporated into their field experience and Capstone Professional Growth Plan. Discussion will focus on common challenges of the transition to teaching, how relationships and interactions will change, and the resources available to support candidates through the time of transition.

During Part 1, candidates will review the program field experience requirements, what counts as field experience, and how to log hours towards field experience. Candidates will also learn more about the roles of program mentors and field supervisors, and how they will interact with the candidate throughout their field experience.

Course Catalog